Mini How-To's

Mini How-To's is a little idea I had to help people with basic stitches, I thought this could be a page you guys can turn to when you need a reminder.

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April 18, 2018

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What You'll Find On This Page

How Many Stitches Do I Need?

Using Inches

Using CM

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Increasing Stitches | Knit

M1

KFB

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Decresing Stitches |Knit

K/P2tog

SSK/P

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How Many Stitches Do I Need?

This is a question we all ask ourselves when it comes to creating a piece of work. I have looked around a few places and found formulas that have worked for me, and I thought it could help you save time when it comes to figuring out how many stitches you may need for your knitted or crocheted master pieces. I find that both of the formuals below are best used together as they each give a slightly different answer, I always pick the number in between but that all depends on the item your making and if it stretches or not.

You can also use these formulas for find out how many rows you may need too.

Using Inches

Inches × Stitches per Inch* = Number Of Stitches You Need To Cast On

 

*(This is written on your label but is usually as a few stitchs per 4inch. For example DK(Light Worsted Weight) Yarn is 22** sts by 30 rows for a  4 by 4 inch square and  to find out how many stitches you need for 1 inch, you need to divide 22 by 4 which gives you 5.5. Now you measure the item or person you're making your knitted or crochet item for in inches. Your equation should look like this

17.25 inches × 5.5 = 94.875

Round the number up or down depending on the stitch you're using and the size your trying to make.)

**You may need to make a tention square to test out the size and make sure it is 4 by 4. If it doesn't come out to the right size you may need to change your needle size.

Using CM's

(CM × Stitches per CM*)÷ 10 = Number Of Stitches You Need To Cast On

 

*(This is written on your label but is usually as a few stitchs per 4inch. For example DK(Light Worsted Weight) Yarn is 22** sts by 30 rows for a 10 by 10 cm square.  For example if your item measured 43 cm you will times that by the 22 sts it states on your label to make a tension square and then you will divde everything but 10 because your tension square on you label will be 10 cm by 10 cm. If you use different size yarns you will need to calcute to what the measurements are on your yarns' label. Your equation should look like this

(43 cm × 22 sts) ÷ 10 = 94.6

Round the number up or down depending on the stitch you're using and the size your trying to make.) 

**You may need to make a tention square to test out the size and make sure it is 10 by 10. If it doesn't come out to the right size you may need to change your needle size.

Increase Stitches | Knit

When you start learning to read stitches you may come across M1 and KFB. These technically mean the same thing as they increase your stitches. The only difference is in the method.

M1

M1 (Make one) - This increase can lean to the left (M1L) or to the right (M1R). If the direction is not specified, you can take your pick.The make one creates a new stitch between two existing stitches. See images below for reference

KFB

KFB (Knit Front Back) - With KFB, you are increasing the number of stitches by knitting two stitches into a single stitch. You first knit into the front of the loop, as you would normally but without removing the stitch from the needle you also knit into the back of the loop

Decrease Stitches | Knit

There are two dcrease methods you will come across when reading patterns. K/P2tog and SSK/P. The differnce between the two stitches is the way your work will angle itself.

K/P2tog

K/P2tog (Knit/Purl 2 Together)  For your next st(s) you will knit or purl 2 stitches together

SSK/P

SSK/P (Slip, Slip, Knit/ Purl) - Insert the left needle into the fronts of these two stitches and knit them together. One stitch is decreased. This decrease slants to the left. On the purl side of the work, the decrease is called slip, slip, purl (ssp). In the same way as ssk, slip the 2 stitches on at a time as if to knit to the right needle.